Clarksville Academy - Promoting Academic Excellence, Moral Integrity, Physical Growth, and Civic Responsibility

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Upper School Course Descriptions

Upper School Course Catalog


ENGLISH CORE Honors English Composition I

1 Credit

Prerequisite: None

Students will read and interpret various styles and genres of literature that will require a higher comprehension level; therefore, in-depth literature analysis and advanced writing skills (in various modes of expository and narrative writing) are emphasized. This course is designed to also enhance students’ vocabulary development, grammar skills, and identification of figurative language. Students will gain experience in research and in writing for research-based assignments.


Honors English Composition II

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors English Composition I

Students will read and interpret various styles and genres of literature that will require a higher comprehension level and a deeper sophistication with analyzing the text. Students will continue to refine advanced writing skills in various modes of expository and narrative writing. This course is designed to also enhance students’ vocabulary development, grammar skills, and identification of figurative language. Students will enhance their research skills and demonstrate mastery through a written research paper.


Honors English III

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors English Composition II

This course is designed to emphasize literary analysis through a basic survey of American literature from Early American to the present. Students will read and evaluate texts through an examination of literary elements while making connections to the time periods in which the texts were written. Students will continue to build on vocabulary and grammar skills while improving researching and writing techniques. Students will continue to advance their research skills by writing for research-based assignments, compiling an annotated bibliography, and writing a research paper.


Advanced Placement Language and Composition (AP English III)

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors English Composition II

The AP English Language and Composition course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes and audiences. Students should anticipate this course to be similar to an introductory college writing course that focuses on exposition, argument, and literary analysis. Special emphasis is given to awareness of interactions among author’s purpose, meaning, and philosophical ideas. Students are required to take the AP English Language and Composition exam in May.


Honors English IV

1 Credit

Prerequisite: AP English III or Honors English III

This course is designed to emphasize literary analysis through a basic survey of European literature. During the course, students will write an annotated bibliography, research paper, and create a presentation of their research to present to the class. In addition, students will demonstrate mastery of grammar skills and continue to develop vocabulary.


Dual Enrollment Senior English

1 High School Credit/6 hours College Credit

Prerequisite: Honors English III or AP English III and acceptance to Austin Peay State University

This course combines high school senior English and the APSU freshman college English courses of 1010 and 1020. The course will focus on the development of the student’s writing skills through a process of thinking, researching, planning, writing, revising, and editing expository essays. The students will read model essays and works of poetry, fiction and drama, and write essays relating to each of the works. An APSU college professor will teach this course either on campus at the university or online (depending on the availability of instructors and students’ schedules). Students will receive both high school and college credit with satisfactory completion (C or better) of this course. The college credit will be earned from Austin Peay State University.


Advanced Placement Literature and Composition (AP English IV)

1 Credit

Prerequisite: AP English III (or H English III with instructor or school counselor approval)

The Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature from various genres and time periods. Through close and active reading of the selected intensive texts of literary merit, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. The approach to analyzing and interpreting the material involves students in learning how to make careful observations of textual detail, establish connections among their observations, and draw from those connections a series of inferences leading to an interpretive conclusion about a piece of writing’s meaning and value. Writing to engage with the literature is central to the class, though not limited to preparing to write the AP essays. Writing assignments focus on the critical analysis of literature and include expository, analytical, and literary argument essays. Additionally, the second semester affords students the opportunity for scholarly research writing based on a global issue facing us today. Their research will culminate in an annotated bibliography, a research paper, and a presentation of their research to the class.


ENGLISH ELECTIVES

Contemporary Literature

½ Credit

This course is designed to encourage reading and thoughtful response to literature. The required reading will be post 1990 and will reflect a variety of genres, cultural backgrounds, and points of view. Students are encouraged to make connections with what is read to their own knowledge and experiences. Students are also challenged to increase their understanding of our diverse population and the world we live in.


Literature of the Bible

½ Credit

This course is designed with the purpose of providing students with the background knowledge necessary for recognizing and understanding Biblical allusions in literature. This course is not a theology class. Students will be taught a brief history of the Bible, but the focus will be on learning about key characters and events found in both the Old and New Testaments, while also studying the style in which the various books of the Bible are written. A variety of different versions and translations of the Bible will be used to give a well-rounded view.


Mythology

½ Credit

This course will provide introductory material in the areas of Classical Greco-Roman and Global Mythology. Students will learn primarily about the Pantheon of gods worshipped and storied in ancient Greece and Rome. Students will also explore mythological tales from other parts of the world. Students will learn a bit about local myths and Legends of Tennessee and the United States as well. There are two major emphases of this course: the comparison of mythological traditions from around the globe analysis of the source, purpose, meaning, and application of myths.


Vocabulary Building

½ Credit

This course is designed to improve students’ vocabulary through an understanding of word roots. Students will embark on an etymological journey by exploring the numerous languages that have influenced English, with a concentration on Classical roots. New words will be practiced through practical application weekly. Students will engage in word competitions through word games such as Scrabble.


PUBLIC SPEAKING/COMMUNICATIONS

Debate

½ Credit

This course is designed to equip students with effective communication skills. Students will receive instruction on how to thoroughly research topics and an emphasis will be placed on improving listening and reasoning skills. Students will present debates based on factual evidence while improving confidence and argument skills. In addition to the history and fundamentals of debating, students will learn about current events, politics, and culture.


Speech

½ Credit

This course is designed with an emphasis on developing students’ communication skills. Students will learn how to thoroughly research topics and how to organize their research. This course highlights the importance of preparation and presentation of informative and persuasive speeches.


Drama

½ Credit

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the origins of theater through the use of our textbook and other written materials. There will also be practical instruction in monologues, improvisation, and technical theatre. In addition, the class will produce one live production per semester.


Publications/Yearbook

1 Credit

This course is designed for students to learn and utilize effective verbal and visual communication, elements of graphic design, elements of digital photography, and a variety of design software to tell the story of the school year by creating the yearbook and other publications. The course offers students a project-based curriculum in which they work collaboratively using technology to produce products for publication. This extensive work of publication requires attending a variety of school activities beyond the regular school day.


Leadership and Strategic Impact

½ Credit

This course provides junior and senior level students with an understanding of the fundamentals needed to become a stronger leader.  Students will explore and uncover the truths about leadership and develop their emerging leadership skills. Students will discuss strategies to sustain high expectations achieved their personal leadership potential while meeting the challenge of high expectations, rigorous coursework, and promoting equity, fairness, and respect with their fellow class members and their peers.


MATHEMATICS CORE

Freshman Algebra I

1 Credit

Prerequisite: None

This first year algebra course is designed for incoming freshman who have not yet had Algebra I or for freshmen who would like a refresher course on basic algebra. Transfer freshmen students may elect to take Algebra I concurrently with Geometry. Students will learn to work with equations, inequalities, and expressions in linear, quadratic, exponential, and radical, and rational forms. They will learn how to work with systems of equations and graphing, understanding the difference between functions and relations. Some time will be spent applying these skills to probability and data analysis problems.


Honors Geometry

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra I

This course is designed to provide a strong foundation in the essentials of geometry. Through lecture, hands-on activities, and practice, students will learn geometry concepts, apply these concepts to real-world problems, and maintain algebra skills. Topics covered include: properties of parallel lines, similar figures, congruent figures, right triangles, constructions, areas, and circles.


Honors Algebra II

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Honors Geometry

This second year algebra course is designed to review the objectives of elementary algebra as well as introduce more complex algebraic concepts along with an introduction to basic trigonometry. Topics covered include: linear, quadratic, and cubic equations and inequalities, polynomials, rational expressions, complex numbers, systems of equations, conic sections, and trigonometry. Additionally, matrices, statistics, and sequences and series will be covered.


Honors Trigonometry and Statistics

1 Credit

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: Geometry, Algebra II

This course is for students who do not plan to pursue Calculus and will focus on trigonometry and other pre-calculus topics. The trigonometric topics will include the basic circular functions (i.e.: sine, cosine, etc.) and their properties, identities, inverses and graphs. Practical applications of trigonometry will be integrated throughout the course. An introduction to probability, statistics and sequences and series will be included. There will be an emphasis placed on preparing for the ACT. Students will also gain familiarity with and be given the opportunity to practice answering ACT type questions.


Honors Pre-Calculus

1 Credit

Prerequisites: Geometry, Algebra II

This course is designed to provide students with a solid foundation for calculus. Topics covered include: properties of functions, polynomials and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, analytical trigonometry and trigonometry topics, analytical geometry topics, systems of equations, inequalities, and sequences and series.


Honors College Algebra

1 Credit

Prerequisites: Algebra I & II, Geometry

This course is a study of functions and their representations with emphasis on the use of functions in problem solving and modeling contexts. Topics include polynomial functions, rational functions, power and root functions, inverse functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, systems of equations, conics and sequence. The course also covers basic probability and mathematical induction.


Dual Enrollment Mathematics

1 High School Credit/6 hours College Credit

Prerequisite: Geometry, Algebra II, and Acceptance to Austin Peay State University

This course combines high school Math and the freshman college Math courses of 1710 (College Algebra) and 1810 (Elements of Calculus). The fall course will focus on a study of functions and the representations with emphasis on the use of functions in problem solving and modeling contexts. Topics include polynomial functions, rational functions, power and root functions, inverse functions, and systems of equations. The spring course will focus on business calculus that is an elementary calculus course with study of limits, the derivative, differentiation techniques, applications of differentiation, the definite integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, and applications of integration. Students will receive both high school and college credit with satisfactory completion of this course. The college credit will be earned from Austin Peay State University.


Advanced Placement Statistics

1 Credit

Prerequisites: Algebra I, II, Geometry, Trig/Stats or PreCalculus

Students in AP Statistics will cultivate an appreciation for the usefulness of mathematics. Statistics is the science of collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Therefore, data exploration and analysis are highly emphasized with anticipating patterns and exploring distributions. A focus of statistical inference is also a major component of this CollegeBoard approved course. Throughout the course students will be expected to demonstrate understanding by explaining concepts verbally, representing data and relationships graphically, and performing computations and analysis with the assistance of the TI-84(PLUS) or higher graphing calculator and with Microsoft Excel and Apple Numbers. Students are required to take the AP Statistics exam in May.


Advanced Placement Calculus AB

1 Credit

Prerequisites: Algebra I, II, Geometry, PreCalculus

This college level course is designed to challenge the mathematically gifted student. Fundamental theorems of differentiation and integration and the connected applications are emphasized. Topics covered include: techniques and application of differentiation, integration, hyperbolic functions, parametric equations, differentiated equations, polar equations, and series. The course covers content of one full year of college Calculus; therefore, students are required to take the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam in May.


MATHEMATICS ELECTIVES

An Introduction to Logic and Rhetoric

½ Credit

Co-/Prerequisite: Algebra, World History, or Instructor’s Approval (if requisites are not met)

This course will provide introductory material in the areas of Logic and Rhetoric. Students will learn to construct and evaluate arguments and understand logical thought processes. Connections will be made to Philosophy, History, and Mathematics. Basic knowledge of World History and Algebra are recommended but not necessary.


SCIENCE CORE AND LAB SCIENCES

Honors Biology

1 Credit

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the living world. The first semester focuses on the cell structure and function. The second semester will give students an overview of the biological world beginning with the most primitive kingdoms and ending with the most advanced. Students will be exposed to various organisms through a combination of lab work, fieldwork, films, and guest speakers. Students will be required to read and write about current events and research as they relate to biology.


Honors Chemistry

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors Biology

This course is designed to provide students with a focus on learning the vocabulary and basic calculations of chemistry and to provide students with the understanding of the basic theories of the structure, resulting properties, and interactions of matter. Students learn to name and write chemical substances and to use these to write balanced equations. The concept of the mole is studied and used throughout the course.


Honors Ecology

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry

Ecology is a laboratory science course that enables students to develop an understanding of the intricate relationships between organisms and the environment, as well as learning about the natural processes that shape the Earth and the organisms that dwell therein. Topics include: the biosphere, biomes (terrestrial and aquatic), energy flow and nutrient cycling in ecosystems, ecological succession, community interactions (herbivory, predation, parasitism, etc.), and population dynamics.


Dual Enrollment Physics

1 High School Credit/8 hours College Credit

Prerequisite: Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry; Algebra II
Acceptance to Austin Peay State University

Dual enrollment physics students will attend lecture classes and a lab class at least four days per week on the campus of Austin Peay with an APSU instructor. The major physics’ concepts covered in Understanding the Physical Word are: Linear Motion, Newton’s Laws, Momentum, Energy, States of Matter, Fluid Dynamics, Heat, and Sound. Overall, students will develop critical and analytical thinking skills related to the conceptual understanding of mechanics, matter, heat, and sound. They will apply concepts to real-world problems and phenomena while developing appropriate scientific communication skills.


Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology

1 Credit

Prerequisites: Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry

Human Anatomy and Physiology is a laboratory science course in which the major organ systems of the human body are studied in detail. Any student interested in pursuing a career in the medical field is encouraged to take this course to help prepare them for more rigorous content at the university level. Laboratories, including dissections, are performed throughout the year to allow the students to apply course content in a hands-on manner.


Advanced Placement Biology

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry

AP Biology is a college-level laboratory science course that explores the major integrating principles of Biology such as molecular biology, energy transfers, cell structure and metabolism, cell reproduction, genetics, evolution, comparative anatomy and physiology of plants and animals, and ecology. Laboratories will be performed consistently throughout the year to stress the importance of using the science method for problem-solving and to apply content in a project-based learning environment. Students are required to take the AP Biology exam in May.


Advanced Placement Chemistry

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry

This course is designed to provide students with an AP Chemistry course that gives them the equivalence of a year of college chemistry. Topics covered include, but are not limited to: properties of matter, classification of matter, atomic structure, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws, thermodynamics, periodic properties, chemical bonding, behavior of liquids and solids, solution chemistry, acids and bases, buffers and solubility, kinetics, electrochemistry, and environmental chemistry. Students are required to take the AP Chemistry exam in May.


SOCIAL SCIENCES CORE

Honors World History

1 Credit

Prerequisite: none

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of world events starting with world religions, the Renaissance and Reformation, Age of Exploration, French and American Revolutions, Industrial Revolution, and Imperialism. The second semester will focus on World War I, the Jazz Age, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, the upheaval of the 1960’s, and the Modern Age. Students who wish to take Advanced Placement United States History during the sophomore year, must take World History during the freshman year.


Honors United States History

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors World History

The Honors United States History course consists of the following content area strands: United States History, Geography, and Humanities. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of United States history from the development of Colonial America to the present day. Students will be exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events, which influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history. Students will be required to access the validity of many common American views and perceptions retaining to historical events in America.


Advanced Placement United States History

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors World History

Advanced Placement United States History offers students an opportunity to complete studies in an Upper School history class that is equivalent to an introductory college course. The AP United States History course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and actual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. Students should learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP U.S. History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.  The primary content emphasis will begin with the foundation of Colonial America to the present day.


Honors Political Science/Government

½ Credit

Prerequisites: Honors World History, Honors or AP United States History

The Upper School’s Political Science course focuses on the United States’ founding principles and beliefs. Students will study the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. The course gives emphasis to the responsibilities and rights of citizenship, the skills necessary for critical thinking, and the knowledge appropriate for wise decision making.


Honors Economics

½ Credit

Prerequisites: Honors World History, Honors or AP United States History

This course is designed to emphasis the study of how people, businesses, and
governments choose to use resources. Students will understand basic needs versus
wants, using versus saving money, and policy making versus decision making. The
elements of society will be explored to develop an appreciation for a variety of human
cultures. Students will use skills and understanding of the six essential elements of
geography. They will learn to construct sound historical arguments to base decisions on
in contemporary life. Students will also understand civil efficacy.


Personal Finance

½ Credit

Personal Finance is a course designed to help students understand the impact of individual choices on occupational goals and future earnings potential. Real world topics covered will include income, money management, spending and credit, as well as saving and investing. Students will design personal and household budgets, simulate the use of checking and saving accounts, demonstrate knowledge of finance, debt, and credit management, and evaluate and understand insurance and taxes. This course will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions.


SOCIAL SCIENCES ELECTIVES

Advanced Placement European History

1 Credit

AP European History focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about European history from approximately 1450 to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past. Five themes of equal importance — Interaction of Europe and the World, Poverty and Prosperity, Objective Knowledge and Subjective Visions, States and Other Institutions of Power, and Individual and Society — provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. These require students to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make comparisons among various historical developments in different times and places.


Honors Modern History

½ Credit

Prerequisites: Honors World History

Co-/Prerequisites: Honors or AP U.S. History

This course is designed to enlighten all participants in some of the most critical current events and topics in modern history over the past century. Students will have a great deal of autonomy regarding the overall scope of their study. Furthermore, the bulk of normal class time will be dedicated to inquiry and discussion. The major assessment for the course will be the culminating project consisting of a researched and informative presentation with an accompanying paper.


Driver Education

½ Credit

Prerequisite: Must be at least 15 yrs. old; Additional Cost $280

This driver education course is typically offered one period each semester. A limited number of open spots are available each term and preference is given to older students. After older students are considered, spaces are given on a first come, first serve basis. This course is designed to include both classroom instruction and student driving instruction. During classroom instruction, students will gain awareness of the tasks and responsibilities of driving. Students will gain knowledge of traffic laws and regulations, understand the impact of natural forces and conditions on driving, and will identify hazardous conditions and the appropriate reaction to avoid or minimize problems. During the driving instruction, students will develop an attitude of safe, courteous, and defensive driving through the practice and observation of driving tasks.


FOREIGN LANGUAGE CORE

Honors Latin I

1 Credit

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed with a focus on exposing students to the culture, history, mythology, and written works of the Roman people. The students will learn elementary Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with an emphasis on translation and grammatical analysis. The National Latin Exam, given annually in March, is required of all Latin students. The test offers successful students opportunities for scholarships and further study. Students in Latin will also join the Junior Classical League, a national student-led organization dedicated to the study of Classics in the modern world with numerous opportunities for leadership and academic success.


Honors Latin II

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors Latin I

This course is designed to lead students to develop complex Latin grammar, syntax and vocabulary, furthering their understanding of the culture, history, and mythology of the ancient world. An emphasis remains on translation and grammatical analysis. Students begin to analyze authentic works from the Classical era. The National Latin Exam, given annually in March, is required of all Latin students. The test offers successful students opportunities for scholarships and further study. Students in Latin will also join the Junior Classical League, a national student-led organization dedicated to the study of Classics in the modern world with numerous opportunities for leadership and academic success.


Honors Latin III

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors Latin I, II

This course is designed as an elective course for students who have completed their basic language instruction. Students will build upon previously learned concepts and vocabulary while reading literature and poetry from authentic Roman authors such as Cicero, Ovid, and Medieval authors. The National Latin Exam, given annually in March, is required of all Latin students. The test offers successful students opportunities for scholarships and further study. Students in Latin will also join the Junior Classical League, a national student-led organization dedicated to the study of Classics in the modern world with numerous opportunities for leadership and academic success. The third year of study culminates in an opportunity to study abroad (based on student interest and instructor availability).


Honors Spanish I

1 Credit

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to promote proficiency in Spanish and gain a richer understanding of the Spanish speaking countries. Students will be engaged in learning functional vocabulary related to our daily lives. The primary focus will be to establish a solid foundation on developing students on the three modes of communication: Interpretive, Presentational, and Interpersonal. A stronger emphasis will be placed on the interpretive and presentational modes. Gaining a strong understanding of the pronunciation of words, sentence structures, idiomatic expressions, and cultural differences and similarities will be emphasized. Students will be engaged in conversations that allow them to apply the target language in a general and functional way. It is our goal for students to become lifelong learners of languages so embedding real and relevant activities where growth is measured in proficiency skills is critical.


Honors Spanish II

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors Spanish I

This course is designed to build on the proficiency skills established in Spanish 1. In addition to responding to basic and functional questions, students will be encouraged to predict supplemental questions that foster a stronger dialogue. Students will be introduced to a broader set of themes that will require them to consider conversations related to the past, present and future. A stronger sense of fluency will be encouraged with students gaining the ability to create, simulate, speak, read, and write in the target language at a more natural speed and pace. Students will continue to study various cultures and will be encouraged to compare and contrast the major cultural themes. The instructional practices will be a blend of 90:10. This means that a majority of Spanish will be spoken and used to instruct and engage the students.


Honors Spanish III

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors Spanish I, II

This course is designed to build on the proficiency skills established in the previous two years. Students at this point should feel comfortable and confident in applying all three modes of communication to the target language. Thematic based learning will be emphasized and students will be able to sustain conversations with fluency and depth. The goal should be for students to be able to communicate with responses and questions that are accurate and that require no interpretation on the part of the listener. Students will be able to interpret situational Spanish and maintain conversations with a stronger sense of depth and knowledge. Students will also begin to develop logical arguments that will allow them to construct original ideas and draw strong conclusions. Students will be encouraged to investigate global themes, compare and contrast, and formulate ideas that will help them make real and relevant connections with the target language. Students will also begin to develop a stronger sense of cultural themes such as politics, religion, art, music and history. Students will also be encouraged to travel abroad so that a total emersion experience can be gained.


Honors Spanish IV

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors Spanish I, II, III

This course is designed to build on the proficiency skills established in the previous three years. A student having taken Spanish at this point has demonstrated a true passion and desire for fluency, and proficiency. While thematic based learning will be emphasized throughout the year, students will also be encouraged to consider ways that Spanish can be used in their career choices. A focus on occupational Spanish will be a strong point of emphasis so that students can simulate vocabulary, sentences and phrases related to potential career choices. At this stage the idea of Global connections should be emphasized and students should feel confident in speaking Spanish in most settings and about most themes. Students will be able to create, debate, analyze, and apply concepts in multiple settings. Students will also be encouraged to travel abroad so that a total emersion experience can be gained.


Honors French I

1 Credit

Prerequisite: None

As an introduction to French aimed at students in their first year of in-depth study, simple everyday French expressions are practiced. The expressions and combinations of expression parts are used by students to form new sentences, to read French conversation, and to answer questions in French about the conversations. Gradual introduction of new vocabulary and verb conjugations help the students to enlarge their speaking ability and understanding. Students also learn about France and other French-speaking areas around the world.


Honors French II

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors French I

Students who continue in their French studies at the second level will enrich their understanding of the fundamentals introduced in the first year of study while developing the skills of listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Students will improve their language as it is spoken at a intermediate level and will communicate with the use of more elaborate structures. Cultural themes of the French- speaking world will be introduced and incorporated through the course.


Honors French III

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors French I, II

Students continuing with French at the third level will be refining conversational French, practicing with text translation with novel studies, and developing sophisticated conversation in French. The third year of study culminates in an opportunity to study abroad (based on student interest and instructor availability).


Honors Italian I

1 Credit

Prerequisite: None

Students are acclimated to the romantic language of Italian through simple, everyday expressions. The course emphasizes an appreciation of the Italian culture. Gradual introduction of new vocabulary and verb conjugations help the students to enlarge their speaking ability and understanding.


Honors Italian II

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Honors Italian I

Students who continue in their Italian studies at the second level will enrich their understanding of the fundamentals introduced in the first year of study while developing the skills of listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Students will improve their language as it is spoken at a intermediate level and will communicate with the use of more elaborate structures. An appreciation of the Italian culture through the education of Italian experiences are emphasized.


FINE ARTS – MUSIC

Pre-AP Music Theory

1 Credit

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed with the purpose of producing musicians who are fluent in the language and mechanics of music and desire to take AP Music Theory the following year. Basic music concepts are covered including pitch, rhythm, scales, key signatures, chords, and aural skills.


Advanced Placement Music Theory

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Pre-AP Music Theory

This course is designed for students who have completed the first year course of study in the Pre-AP Music Theory The students will further develop their musical proficiency, while preparing for the AP Music Theory exam. A high score on this exam will grant college credit for this course.


Concert Choir I

½ Credit (Semester I only)

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to allow students to learn vocal skills as they sing in a group. They will develop posture and breathing techniques necessary for proper singing. Music theory is also incorporated to teach students how to read music, but the focus is on vocal skills. The semester culminates in end of the semester concerts. A uniform look is required, so the purchase of similar attire is mandatory.


Advanced Concert Choir II, III, IV

½ Credit (Semester I only)

This course is designed to allow students to continue to develop vocal skills as they sing in a group. They will improve upon posture and breathing techniques necessary for proper singing. Music theory continues be applicable to students’ study of music and how to read music, but the focus is on vocal skills. The semester culminates in end of the semester concerts. A uniform look is required, so the purchase of similar attire is mandatory.

*Seniors and juniors (instructor approval) who have prior experience in at least two years of Concert Choir may choose to take only Show Choir second semester.


Show Choir I

½ Credit (Semester II only)

Prerequisite: Concert Choir

This course is designed to emphasize singing and movement. This group provides entertainment at CA’s annual “Evening with Friends” dinner and to local organizations. They learn Broadway and Pop style music, and the purchase of a costume (or costumes) is required. There are five weeks of intense rehearsals after school and on weekends. Every two years, this group travels to perform in a major U.S. city. Past destinations have included New Orleans, San Antonio, and New York City.


Advanced Show Choir II, III, IV

½ Credit (Semester II only)

Prerequisite: Appropriate level of Concert Choir and Show Choir

This course is designed to emphasize singing and movement. This group provides entertainment at CA’s annual “Evening with Friends” dinner and to local organizations. They learn Broadway and Pop style music, and the purchase of a costume is required. There are five weeks of intense rehearsals after school and on weekends. Every two years, this group travels to perform in a major U.S. city. Past destinations have included New Orleans, San Antonio and New York City.


Piano I

1 Credit

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to include music reading and basic piano skills. Students will study piano history and literature. Students will share the skills they have developed and the music that they have learned by using our technology applications to record themselves and share with their instructor, friends, and families. A maximum of ten students may be enrolled in this course.


Piano II

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Piano I or permission from instructor

This course is designed to be a continuation of the study of reading and playing music for piano. The student coming into this class should have a minimum of one year of piano study and be able to demonstrate their proficiency at playing and reading basic first year pieces of music. The student will continue on this path with more difficult music and more advanced theory skills.


Piano III

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Piano II or permission from instructor

This course is designed to be a continuation of the study of reading and playing music for piano. The student coming into this class should have a minimum of two years of piano study and be able to demonstrate their proficiency at playing and reading basic second year pieces of music. The student will continue on this path with more difficult music and more advanced theory skills.


Digital Music Composition (using GarageBand)

½ Credit

Prerequisite: None

Digital Music Composition is a one semester hands-on course that is a wonderful way for musicians and non-musicians alike to unleash their musical creativity through the use of the GarageBand software on the student MacBook Pro. Whether students are accomplished musicians or not, GarageBand is the most rewarding way to create, perform and record their own music. Students will learn interfacing and basic recording techniques using loops and assembling them into a composition and then move on to arranging, editing and mixing tracks, adding effects and distributing their music files. Additionally, creating personal podcasts, including video files, will be covered.


Guitar I

½ Credit

Prerequisite: None

This beginner’s course will introduce students to the basics of acoustic guitar. Students will learn a variety of chords, scales, and techniques to help them develop a strong foundation in music and guitar. Students will also learn about proper guitar upkeep and care. An acoustic guitar is required for this course.


FINE ARTS – VISUAL

Art Appreciation

½ Credit

This course is a prerequisite to all Art courses.
This course is designed to introduce and expose students to a variety of art methods and
concepts. Students will explore many aspects of art including basic visual elements and design principles, processes and media used by artists, and historical styles influenced by time. This instructor also provides students with a basis for recognition and interpretation of the images that surround us.


Ceramics

½ or 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Art Appreciation

This course is designed to provide students with hands on training and experience in the various methods of hand building techniques, the potter’s wheel, and the methods of glazing and the firing of ceramic pieces.


Computer Design

½ or 1 Credit

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to engage students in the studies of electronic imaging and the subsequent preparation of portfolio quality works while simultaneously developing higher thinking and learning skills as they apply to electronic arts. The students will produce a portfolio of works and exhibit proficiency at computer-based artistry.


Printmaking

½ or 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Art Appreciation

This course is designed to provide an in-depth level of study in the hands on making of fine art prints. The class may include working in the following print methods in both black and white and color: monotype, pressless prints, sun prints, string prints, linoleum cuts, woodcuts, collaborative prints, and pochoir. Each student will prepare a portfolio of works while developing an ever more discriminating sensibility towards art.


Sculpture

½ or 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Art Appreciation

This course is designed as an introduction to three-dimensional materials, techniques, and sculptural processes. Students will be able to create and appreciate three-dimensional forms while working on individual and group projects.


Studio Art

½ or 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Art Appreciation and a previous art course

This course is designed to provide an in-depth level of study in the hands on making of fine art projects. Under the instructor’s guidance, students will produce a portfolio of quality work and students are expected to participate in all available competitions or exhibitions. The class may include working in the following art media: drawing, painting, printmaking, collage, and ceramics. Studio art will allow students to independently work on projects of their own choosing.


Calligraphy

½ or 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Art Appreciation

This course is designed to provide hands on training and working experience in various calligraphic writing styles, the art of illumination, presentation, artist books and looking at major historic references.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Wellness

1 Credit

Required for all 9th grade students

In smaller groups divided by gender, Wellness includes physical education and health for all freshman students and transfer students who have not yet had the course. In the classroom, students will examine mental health, emotional health, personal health, and social health. Students will also receive CPR training. In the physical fitness portion of the course, an emphasis on daily fitness through the demonstrated competency in basic and advanced motor skills and tactics in the following categories: fitness activities, fitness stations, weight training, individual/dual sports, outdoor pursuits, team sports, and cooperative games/activities. Students will perform appropriate offensive and defensive skills in a variety of individual, dual, and team activities that are developmentally appropriate. Students will also use heart rate monitors to evaluate their personal cardiovascular activities; calories burned, target heart rate zones, and overall work capacity.


Fitness

½ or 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Wellness

This course is designed to provide a weight training routine that is not sport specific and can benefit any student. It is a multi-joint program that works the entire body over the course of a semester or year. Through weight training, core training, and circuit training each student will see vast improvements in their cardiovascular system and fitness level. By following personalized training principles, students feel energy levels increase and gain confidence from personal success. Students will also use heart rate monitors to evaluate their personal cardiovascular activities; calories burned, target heart rate zones, and overall work capacity. Engagement in exercise and physical activity according to personal plans leads students toward developing healthy habits that will last a lifetime.